L-Citrulline DL-Malate (1:1) Powder

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Supplement Facts & Directions

Supplement Facts

Serving Size: 2500 milligrams
Servings Per Container: Varies
Amount Per Serving % Daily Value*
L-Citrulline 1250 mg
DL-Malate 1250 mg

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.
† Daily Value Not Established
‡ These supplement facts may vary from the product you receive. Please call for exact numbers.

Other Ingredients: None

Contains:

Free of: Sugar, Soy, Dairy, Yeast, Gluten, Corn & Additives.

Directions: As a dietary supplement, take 2500 mg (3/4 tsp) twice daily, or as directed by a physician.

Warning: If you are pregnant, nursing, taking any medications or have any medical condition consult your physician before use. Keep out of reach of children.

Product Details

What is Citrulline Malate?

Citrulline

L-Citrulline DL-Malate 1:1, often shortened to citrulline malate, is an equal blend of l-citrulline and malic acid. The first references to citrulline date back to the late 19th century, but researchers wouldn’t isolate it until 1914 in a watermelon culture. Its name comes from Citrullus, the Latin word for watermelon. Interest in citrulline declined until scientists learned of its pivotal role in the urea cycle in the 1930s.

The urea cycle allows the body to excrete toxic ammonia by first converting it into carbamoyl phosphate. From there, the carbamoyl phosphate produces citrulline from ornithine by transferring a phosphate group. The citrulline goes on to create argininosuccinate, which is the precursor to synthesizing l-arginine. Arginase enzymes go to work on the arginine and break it down into urea and ornithine. The body excretes the urea and sends the ornithine back to begin the cycle anew.

Citrulline also helps to produce nitric oxide (NO). It’s a precursor to arginine, which the body needs to synthesize nitric oxide.

Malate (Malic Acid)

Malic acid is the primary acid in fruits, and many owe their tart or sour flavors to it. Malic acid plays a role in the citric acid cycle, sometimes called the Krebs cycle or tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA). The body relies on the citric acid cycle as its primary power source. The malate converts NADPH into NADH. The body needs NADH to produce adenosine triphosphate (ATP). ATP provides energy at the cellular level to enable numerous cellular processes.

Potential Citrulline Malate Benefits

Citrulline Malate For Exercise Performance

Citrulline boosts arginine levels to promote nitric oxide synthesis. Nitric oxide is a vasodilator that widens blood vessels for better blood flow. It also allows for much more effective nutrient and oxygen delivery to muscles during vigorous exercise. More nutrients also allow muscles to repair and recover quicker. Nitric oxide can also improve how well the body uses other amino acids, such as creatine and branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), both of which stimulate lean muscle growth. Unfortunately, the body usually breaks down nitric oxide rapidly. However, research shows that citrulline paired with reduced glutathione (GSH) inhibited this process by improving nitric oxide availability. 

What Does 1:1 Mean?

PureBulk’s L-Citrulline DL-Malate (1:1) Powder contains a ratio of one part citrulline to one part malic acid. It’s important to ensure an equal or larger ratio of citrulline to malate for maximum efficacy. Some individuals may experience more potent results with citrulline malate 2:1.

Research also shows that citrulline malate can improve exercise performance. One study reported a 53% increase in exercise repetitions for participants taking citrulline malate compared to the placebo group.

Citrulline malate continues to provide benefits after workouts, too. Performing more reps or delaying muscle fatigue may expedite muscle growth, but it often results in worse post-workout soreness. Several studies show that Citrulline malate effectively reduces muscle soreness for a faster recovery after intense workouts. One proposed mechanism is citrulline’s role in the urea cycle by eliminating ammonia waste in the muscles. Another possibility is that citrulline boosts nitric oxide production via arginine. Nitric oxide acts as a vasodilator, which widens and relaxes blood vessels for better nutrient delivery to muscles. The research also supports citrulline malate’s effects on muscle soreness. One study reported that participants who took citrulline malate before working out experienced 40% less soreness over the 48 hours immediately following intense exercise.

Citrulline malate may promote faster strength gains through a combination of actions. It provides muscles with more energy, improves muscle oxygen capacity, reduces muscle fatigue, allows individuals to perform more work, and reduces post-workout soreness. Less soreness may also shorten the recovery period between workouts.

Citrulline Malate and Nitric Oxide

Citrulline boosts arginine levels to promote nitric oxide synthesis. Nitric oxide is a vasodilator that widens blood vessels for better blood flow. It also allows for much more effective nutrient and oxygen delivery to muscles during vigorous exercise. More nutrients also allow muscles to repair and recover quicker. Nitric oxide can also improve how well the body uses other amino acids, such as creatine and branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), both of which stimulate lean muscle growth. Unfortunately, the body usually breaks down nitric oxide rapidly. However, research shows that citrulline paired with reduced glutathione (GSH) inhibited this process by improving nitric oxide availability.

L-Citrulline vs. Citrulline Malate

Both l-citrulline and citrulline malate can increase nitric oxide production. However, combining malic acid with l-citrulline enhances this effect for better NO production and waste removal from muscles. The combination is also superior for boosting energy and reducing delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) after workouts. Malic acid also enhances citrulline absorption and bioavailability in the body.

Potential Citrulline Malate Side Effects

L-Citrulline DL-Malate does not typically cause side effects, as both l-citrulline and malic acid occur naturally in foods, and l-citrulline plays an important role in the urea cycle. Stomach upset may occur in some individuals. Individuals taking nitrate medications or medications for erectile dysfunction should consult with a physician before taking citrulline malate. These medications alter blood flow and may interact with citrulline malate.

References

Tested by Accredited 3rd Party Labs

PureBulk's supplements are tested by accredited third party labs in the USA to ensure their identity, purity and potency. To receive a copy of these test results or any other PureBulk supplement please fill out the COA request form found here.

*NOTE: These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.